Tuesday, May 1, 2018

What I Read- April 2018

I made a goal back in January of reading 100 books this year...I'm not sure how that is going to work out....anyway, I read four books this month. Hope you enjoy my reviews. Here is a link to my other book reviews.

The Doctor's Lady (Jody Hedlund)
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Christian Romance, Historical Fiction; 4 stars

I'll start with my complaint: too much kissing!

She wants to go to the mission field in India. He is headed west to minister to the Indians. The hitch? The mission board won't allow either of them to go solo. They are all in favor of both plans...as long as they find a marriage partner. In a rash move spurred on by her mother, he proposes marriage...but promises it will be in name only, a business arrangement. She resigns herself to the fact that maybe God didn't want her in India, and says yes to the agreement. He doubts that she can withstand the hardships of the west. Throughout the journey west, she tries hard to prove herself to him. He is still convinced that as soon as they make it to Oregon, he will get an annulment and send her home. But, as the journey progresses, through hardships, trials, and problems, the two of them fall in love with each other, eventually changing their agreement to be a real marriage.

If you read this book, read the author's note at the end. This is a work of Historical Fiction, based off the story of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman.

The Lion, The Witch, And the Wardrobe (C.S. Lewis)
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Fantasy, Allegory; 5 stars

No, this is not the first time I've read this book.
Interesting fact: I knew I loved this book before I read it this time, but I had to read it for school, with the intent of writing a literary analysis. While reading it, I was paying more attention to how C.S. Lewis develops plot, characters, setting, conflict, resolution, and all the other story elements. (My question to answer in the literary analysis was: "What makes this book a classic?") And I realized (right now as I'm writing this review) that looking for these elements and analyzing them has made this book even more dear to me.

Okay, enough about that. This book is about four children (Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy) who have to flee London during WW2. While away in the country at a professor's house, Lucy discovers a world in a wardrobe. The other three don't believe her until they too stumble into the world in a wardrobe...a world called Narnia, where animals talk, trees take sides, and there are wonderful creatures like Fauns, centaurs, giants, and dwarfs. The children are whisked away on an adventure filled with love, redemption, treachery, battle, and glory, meeting the great Aslan, and falling in love with Narnia.

Along the way, the reader is sure to fall in love with this beautiful country as well.

Queen Eleanor: Independent Spirit of the Medieval World (Polly Schoyer Brooks)

Biography; 5 stars

Have you ever heard of Eleanor of Aquitaine? If your answer is no, then you MUST read this book. This woman...wow.

Eleanor was a young woman, heiress to the duchy of Aquitaine (in what is now southern France). In a strategic marriage, Eleanor marries the next King of France, Louis. France is much duller than Aquitaine, and Eleanor, who was hoping for a knight in shining armor husband she could love, is disappointed both with her new home, and her new husband. Louis is a pious man, more of a monk than a King. Eleanor wanted a strong man for a husband, and she feels Louis is weak and wishy-washy. Besides that, he is a terrible military commander. Louis follows the call to battle as a crusader, and Eleanor and all her colorful court (which she brought from Aquitaine to Paris) go along. But the crusade ends in disaster. Eleanor wants to get a divorce, and eventually she does. Almost immediately after getting divorced, she remarries. Her next husband is Henry, who is Duke of Normandy. But pretty soon, Henry becomes King of England, and Eleanor is Queen. Although she has found her strong, chivalrous, knightly husband, her story is far from over. Eleanor had a lot of children, and her life (eighty plus years) was full of intrigue, suspense, adventure, betrayal...

This book is written with a younger audience in mind, which was nice because you don't have to worry about the "questionable stuff" in Eleanor's life being talked about in the book. Also, it made it a short, easy read. Eleanor is such an interesting character in history...I highly recommend this book if you want to learn more about this woman.

The Secret Garden (Frances Hodgson Burnett) 
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Fiction; 5 stars

I recently saw The Secret Garden musical at our local Christian University. It made me realize that it has been a loooong time since I read the book...so, yes, I bought it on kindle that night (49 cents, so not a very high quality version) and started reading it.

Mary Lennox is a young spoiled girl who lives in India. All of the sudden, everyone she knows and loves (as much as a spoiled brat can love someone) are dead and she is sent to England to live with her Uncle. Mary is an unpleasant, disagreeable, sickly looking child whom no one likes. She is given mostly free reign of the mysterious home and grounds, and she discovers many secrets. While discovering these secrets, Mary grows stronger and healthier than ever before...and she learns to like, and even love, several people.

P.S. If you have a book you would like me to read and review, or a book recommendation, please leave it in the comments! I would love to add it to my list! :) And don't forget to subscribe to see book reviews and more from Inside My Brain! 

And I can't forget this month's reading quote...
No instead you have to put the book down and talk to people!:(




4 comments:

  1. The Secret Garden is one of my very favorite books! There's a special edition I always get from the library that has GORGEOUS illustrations, which adds even more magic to the already-magical story. :)

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    1. Yeah, it was kind of a bummer not to have illustrations in this version. :)

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  2. Have you ever read "Transforming Grace" by Jerry Bridges? That is one of my absolute favorite books ever, even though it's nonfiction. It details how God's grace should actually look in our lives if we believe it. I think you'd like it.

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    1. That sounds like an amazing book. Just added it to my list!

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